By March 7, 2013 Read More →

Working from home – corporate style v self employed

How is working from home different when you work for yourself?

Work from Home Wisdom - working from home, Janine BeattieJanine Beattie of Optimum Business Support has been a corporate home worker and is now working from home running her own business, so she’s in a good position to compare both experiences.

Hi Janine, who did you work for and what did you do when you were in corporate life?
I worked for Orange Business Services from 2006 to 2008.  I started working from home when Orange relocated offices and gave all staff the opportunity to work remotely.  I was home based with occasional travel to St Albans or head office in London, but also required to travel the country as part of my role.
 
What was your working from home routine?
If I had a home day, my routine was pretty good, kids to school and back home by 8:45 – straight to work with no delay.  If I needed to be at meetings or my diary was fairly full, I usually logged onto the laptop before the kids were up and just cracked on, the same applied at night. And I used to go into the office occasionally just for the office routine.
 
Why did you become self-employed?
I took voluntary redundancy from Orange and looked around for a job that would pay the bills and allow me to continue working from home.
I wanted to be able to take the kids to school, do the odd reading day in class – as a single parent, with no family around me or support network, this was absolutely key for me! 
But the jobs just weren’t there, it would have meant commuting to London or Birmingham and full time child care costs were just too much. I was lucky to get onto the last of the free courses run by Business Link and Optimum was born…

And how does working from home differ now?
I work twice as hard …. Whilst working for a corporate you know you have a salary, you can “have lunch” and skip a few hours, money is coming in. 
Whereas now, I don’t work, I don’t get paid, I am more motivated, more focused and more determined.  Nothing at home distracts me.  I also have a separate office to ensure that I separate work and home.
 
What are the pros and cons of working from home as an employee or your own boss?
Working from home as an employee
Pro’s

  • Flexibility
  • Fixed income
  • Always know there is an office to go to if you need support, printing or just a chat
  • Easier to bunk off without anyone noticing “in a meeting”

Con’s

  • Can be easy to “switch the telly on”
  • Easily distracted
  • Your friends don’t think twice when popping round for a cuppa and distract you

Working from home as your own boss
Pro’s

  • You are your own boss, if you want a day’s leave, you have it!
  • Your office is yours
  • I can play my iTunes as loud as I like!
  • You dictate the hours to suite your lifestyle
  • You are in control

 
Con’s

  • It can get lonely – which is why I network with like-minded business people
  • You don’t work, you don’t get paid!  That is all…

In a nutshell, working from home is not for everyone, but it works for me as it suits my lifestyle.
 
Janine provides marketing and business support to business owners and time starved professionals through Optimum Business Support. She also owns and runs four Women in Business Network franchises.

Are you working from home as an employee or your own boss? What are the biggest pros and cons for you?
 

Posted in: Routine

2 Comments on "Working from home – corporate style v self employed"

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  1. Janine Beattie says:

    Thank you for allowing me to share my views, as a home worker, I wouldn’t change it for the world, it can be lonely and isolated but if you remain focussed and disciplined and you have a good network around you it can really work for you. Thanks again.

    • It’s pleasure to share your experience on the blog, Janine. And I’m hoping that one day we might be able to persuade you into telling us more about being made redundant and starting your own business, which is highly topical 🙂

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